journal

february
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Februarys are hard. It’s hot. It’s really hot and not befitting of people with pale skin and dark hair that conducts heat like metal. In other words, it’s not my favourite month. But it usually coincides with the ushering of the Lunar New Year, and the opportunity to start afresh if January didn’t quite work out, and the Perth Festival. With this in mind, the month is more of a glass half full situation (provided I remain indoors). Read more.

Danica van de Velde
january
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At the start of 2019 I wrote a list of loose resolutions, which included keeping notes on anything (books, films, music, objects) that I enjoyed throughout each month. I don’t actually believe in resolutions, but here is a first gesture towards some structured note taking for 2019. Read more.

Danica van de Velde
seven rules
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Arrange flowers as if they are growing in the field
Lay the charcoal so that it heats the water well
In the summer, suggest coolness
In the winter, warmth
Be ready ahead of time
Prepare for rain just in case
Treat guests with the utmost consideration

Sen no Rikyu's "Seven Rules for the Way of Tea" (cited in Kenya Hara's White) also make for appropriate resolutions for a gentle new year.

Photograph by Johanna Tagada

a possible horizon
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A new landscape, a possible horizon, a place of rest and absolute beauty. […] This was an undiscovered ocean for us. It was impossible, yet it was real, we saw this landscape. Like no other landscape. We felt it. We traveled together to countless sunsets. But where did this object come from? Who produced this piece that risked itself by being so fragile, just laying on the floor, no base, no plexiglass box on top of it…. A place to dream, to regain energy, to dare.

- Felix Gonzalez-Torres on Roni Horn’s The Gold Field (1980-82)

Danica van de Veldeart
tender attempts

“Teaism is a cult founded on the adoration of the beautiful among the sordid facts of everyday existence. It inculcates purity and harmony, the mystery of mutual charity, the romanticism of the social order. It is essentially a worship of the Imperfect, as it is a tender attempt to accomplish something possible in this impossible thing we know as life.”

— Kakuzo Okakura

agnès
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Frieze: What could you imagine doing if you didn’t do what you do?

Agnès Varda: Finding ways other than photography and cinema to capture fragile instants – as substitutes for memory.